Lab of Wolfgang Liedtke, MD PhD

 
 

The Liedtke Lab is part of the Duke University Center for Translational Neuroscience, which is based in the Division of Neurology (Department of Medicine) and the Department of Neurobiology. We aim to deconstruct sensing mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, organ/systems and organismal level. Specifically, our interest is focused on osmotic and mechanical stimuli as highly relevant sensory cues. The sensory system most pertinent for our mission is the nociceptive system of the nervous system, which is necessary to evoke pain in conscious animals including humans, yet directs aversive behavior in virtually all animals that have a nervous system.  Because of the relevance for pain and nociception, besides tonicity and mechanical stimuli, pathophysiologically relevant modulatory co-stimuli such as inflammatory mediators are also being considered. Finally, neural transmission mechanisms of such stimuli are also being explored.

Center for Translational Neurosciencehttp://neurobiology.duhs.duke.edu/CTN/main/index.shtmlhttp://neurobiology.duhs.duke.edu/CTN/main/index.shtmlshapeimage_3_link_0
Department of Neurologyhttp://neurology.mc.duke.edu/http://neurology.mc.duke.edu/shapeimage_4_link_0

Welcome

Duke Medicinehttp://medicine.duke.edu/http://medicine.duke.edu/shapeimage_5_link_0

contact web designer


Lab Highlights



Yong Chen was recently awarded an F33 Senior Fellowship NIDCR Grant in Bethesda MD  in September 2014. He won the first prize award for best contribution by a junior investigator given by the US TMJ Association, held jointly with NIH-NIDCR.




Video 3D pore of the OSM-9 channel - Nature Communications paper Lindy et-al.

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140902/ncomms5734/extref/ncomms5734-s3.avi




For other lab highlights, go to News Page